How to Drive or Drill Your Own Well

One of the hurdles to living off the grid is having a clean water supply. One of the very best ways to address that issue is with your own well.

When deciding on a location for your off-grid homestead, check with your local geological survey office to find out if the soil conditions there will allow you to install a well. Once you know you can dig a well on your land, here are some tips for actually driving or drilling your well.

Before You Start

First, decide if you want to drive or drill your well and check with your local building department to see if a permit is required. If a local utility company provides service to properties in the vicinity, check with them and make sure no underground service lines cross your property and, if they do, determine their location before you start digging.

Determine if there are any sewer lines, old cisterns, or septic systems on the land. Find out what your local building code requires as far as distance or setbacks for a well from any of these structures. If your local code does not address this specifically, you should dig at least 50 feet away from them to avoid contaminating your water supply.

Selecting A Good Location

Your well needs to be in a place with a higher elevation than any sewer lines, cisterns, or septic systems. Also, check for soil quality. Never build a well in a marshy, wet area.

For selecting good location, you can use professionalgeological prospecting equipment, PQWT-TC geophysical prospecting mapping with one button underground water detector utilize the natural electric field as working electromagnetic field source, based on the resistivity differences of underground rock , ore or groundwater, measure natural electric field on the ground of N different frequencies electric field component.

The device can automatically form the profile map and curve graph in the instrument, that means you cancheck if the location is suitable for drilling, through comparing and analysis, toget thebestdrill positionafter geological propecting. It can save your lots of cost and time.

Driving a Well

The less expensive, but more physically demanding, way to dig your well is to drive it. However, if the soil in your area is high in clay content, you may find it difficult to impossible to drive your own well and you will have to drill.

Drilling a Well

If soil conditions in your area (or physical strength limitations) prohibit you from driving a well on your own, you can either pay a professional to drill the well (very expensive) or you can purchase a kit and drill it yourself.

You will also need an air compressor providing at least 90 PSI of air to drive the motor and the drill bit and to keep the mud coming back to the surface, so you do not end up with a big mud hole with your drill stuck in it. If you opt for drilling your well rather than driving it and you go deeper than 50 feet or so, you will need an in-ground pump to move the water to the surface.

A Few Things to Note

Regardless of whether your drive or drill your well, the first 100 gallons of water will be muddy. That should clear once you get past the 100-gallon mark. And never use your well water until you have it tested to ensure that it is not contaminated with any type of chemicals, bacteria or other foreign substances. Drilling or driving a well isn’t that difficult once you know the steps, and the work is well worth the benefit!


For more information, please contact PQWT Team.


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